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Autor:  Dale-USA
E-mail:  dale_thomas2004@yahoo.com.br
Data:  22/FEV/2013 12:23 PM
Assunto:  long time no see/talk/talking
 
Mensagem:  Eddie, we are used to "Long time, no see." You will not face execution by the English Language Police if you trade "see" for "talk" or "speak", but it sounds a little odd.  I am not saying it is wrong or never used, just that it sounds a little odd.

Another expression is "In a coon's age..."  Eddie, we haven't a beer together in a coon's age.

A "coon" is colloquial for "raccoon".  It is clearly a cousin of the Brazilian quati, but there are a few differences:  afraid of man, lives as part of a family unit not a band, shorter legs-nose-tail.  In the woods, the coon would be hunted for its meat.  I don't believe there is a current market for the pelts.  "Coon" is a good word to avoid.  Sometimes it was used to mean Afro-American.  If you say it to a stranger, he may misunderstand and think you are talking about a human being, not an animal of the forest.  Be aware.

This came up at a conference I attended in Porto Alegre.  An English "expert" thought the speaker in a dialogue meant black person, but the text clearly showed it was referring to the raccoon.


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 English Made in Brazil -- English, Portuguese, & contrastive linguistics
long time no see/talk/talking  –  eddie  22/FEV/2013, 11:50 AM
 long time no see/talk/talking  –  Dale-USA  22/FEV/2013, 12:23 PM
long time no see/talk/talking  –  eddie  22/FEV/2013, 2:19 PM
long time no see/talk/talking  –  Dale-USA  22/FEV/2013, 3:32 PM

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