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Autor:  Ana M
E-mail:  não-disponível
Data:  25/OUT/2005 10:45 PM
Assunto:  Substantivos Gerundios
 
Mensagem: 

Alo' Pessoal:

The first sentence given is the correct one.

My plan for the weekend is to go to the beach.

Unfortunately, it is beyond my capability to explain why in plain English, but I will try to guide you to a site that does have some sample sentences and a chart or 2:

 

http://owl.english.purdue.edu/handouts/grammar/g_verbals.html#ger-inf

 

That is where my Google search took me when I looked for

"infinitive + gerund + which"

 

I'll see if I can paste here a little from the site [the charts don't come out right; they look like lists] EIS:

 

Comparing Gerunds and Infinitives
The difference in the form of gerunds and infinitives is quite clear just from comparing the following lists:

Gerunds: swimming, hoping, telling, eating, dreaming
Infinitives: to swim, to hope, to tell, to eat, to dream
Their functions, however, overlap. Gerunds always function as nouns, but infinitives often also serve as nouns. Deciding which to use can be confusing in many situations, especially for people whose first language is not English.

Confusion between gerunds and infinitives occurs primarily in cases in which one or the other functions as the direct object in a sentence. In English some verbs take gerunds as verbal direct objects exclusively while other verbs take only infinitives and still others can take either. Many such verbs are listed below, organized according to which kind of verbal direct object they take.

 

Verbs that take only infinitives as verbal direct objects

agree
 decide
 expect
 hesitate
 
learn
 need
 promise
 neglect
 
hope
 want
 plan
 attempt
 
propose
 intend
 pretend
  

Examples:
I hope to go on a vacation soon.
(not: I hope going on a vacation soon.*)

He promised to go on a diet.
(not: He promised going on a diet. *)

They agreed to sign the treaty.
(not: They agreed signing the treaty.*)

Because she was nervous, she hesitated to speak.
(not: Because she was nervous, she hesitated speaking.*)

They will attempt to resuscitate the victim
(not: They will attempt resuscitating the victim.*)
 

Verbs that take only gerunds as verbal direct objects

deny
 risk
 delay
 consider
 
can't help
 keep
 give up
 be fond of
 
finish
 quit
 put off
 practice
 
postpone
 tolerate
 suggest
 stop (quit)
 
regret
 enjoy
 keep (on)
 dislike
 
admit
 avoid
 recall
 mind
 
miss
 detest
 appreciate
 recommend
 
get/be through
 get/be tired of
 get/be accustomed to
 get/be used to
 

 

Examples:
They always avoid drinking before driving.
(not: They always avoid to drink before driving.*)

I recall asking her that question.
(not: I recall to ask her that question.*)

She put off buying a new jacket.
(not: She put off to buy a new jacket.*)

Mr. Allen enjoys cooking.
(not: Mr. Allen enjoys to cook.*)

Charles keeps calling her.
(not: Charles keeps to call her.*)
 

Verbs that take gerunds or infinitives as verbal direct objects

start
 begin
 continue
 hate
 
prefer
 like
 love
 try
 remember
 
 

Examples:
She has continued to work at the store.
She has continued working at the store.

They like to go to the movies.
They like going to the movies.

Brent started to walk home.
Brent started walking home.
 

Forget and remember

These two verbs change meaning depending on whether a gerund or infinitive is used as the object.

 

Examples:
Jack forgets to take out the cat. (He regularly forgets.)
Jack forgets taking out the cat. (He did it, but he doesn't remember now.)

Jack forgot to take out the cat. (He never did it.)
Jack forgot taking out the cat. (He did it, but he didn't remember sometime later.)

Jack remembers to take out the cat. (He regularly remembers.)
Jack remembers taking out the cat. (He did it, and he remembers now.)

Jack remembered to take out the cat. (He did it.)
Jack remembered taking out the cat. (He did it, and he remembered sometime later.)
In the second of each pair of example sentences above, the past progressive gerund form having taken can be used in place of taking to avoid any possible confusion.

 

Hope this helps.  Keep studying!  :)

Um abraço,

Ana


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Índice de mensagens


 English Made in Brazil -- English, Portuguese, & contrastive linguistics
Substantivos Gerundios  –  Eduarda  25/OUT/2005, 8:50 AM
Substantivos Gerundios  –  Rick Leal  25/OUT/2005, 7:10 PM
Substantivos Gerundios  –  Tiago  25/OUT/2005, 7:24 PM
Substantivos Gerundios  –  Rick Leal  25/OUT/2005, 8:17 PM
Substantivos Gerundios  –  Eduarda  26/OUT/2005, 7:42 AM
Substantivos Gerundios  –  Ana M  26/OUT/2005, 10:14 AM
Substantivos Gerundios  –  Rick Leal  26/OUT/2005, 10:31 AM
Substantivos Gerundios  –  Eduarda  27/OUT/2005, 12:07 PM
Substantivos Gerundios  –  Ana M  27/OUT/2005, 12:22 PM
Substantivos Gerundios  –  Ana M  27/OUT/2005, 4:22 PM
Substantivos Gerundios  –  Rick Leal  26/OUT/2005, 10:19 AM
Substantivos Gerundios  –  Ana M  26/OUT/2005, 1:16 PM
Substantivos Gerundios  –  Rick Leal  27/OUT/2005, 5:50 PM
Substantivos Gerundios  –  Johannes  28/OUT/2005, 11:30 AM
Substantivos Gerundios  –  Eduarda  31/OUT/2005, 10:27 AM
Substantivos Gerundios  –  Ana M  01/NOV/2005, 3:17 PM
 Substantivos Gerundios  –  Ana M  25/OUT/2005, 10:45 PM
Substantivos Gerundios  –  Rodolfo  26/OUT/2005, 5:02 PM
Substantivos Gerundios  –  Claudemir  08/NOV/2006, 9:31 PM

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