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Autor:  Dale/RS
E-mail:  não-disponível
Data:  05/NOV/2005 3:31 AM
Assunto:  to bring off x to pull off
 
Mensagem: 

Nobody though Lula would win the election he brough it off.

Nobody though Lula would win the election he pulled it off.

-------------------------

I think you mean:

(a) Nobody thought Lula would win the election, but he brought it off.

(b) Nobody thought Lula would win the election, but he pulled it off.

 

or possibly

 

(c) Nobody thought Lula would win the election he brought off.

(d) Nobody thought Lula would win the election he pulled off.

 

 

The sentences mean the same.  That is, (a) = (b), and (c) = ( d).

 

"To pull off" is more common.  Often, instead of meaning to achieve something unexpected or against great odds, "to pull off" means merely "to do".  "To bring off" sounds better in the past tense to these old ears than it does in the present tense. 

 

The criminal is going to bring off a robbery. = sounds odd

The criminal is going to pull off a robbery. = better, more natural

The criminal brought off a bank robbery. = okay

The criminal pulled off a bank robbery. = better, more natural
 

 

 


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Índice de mensagens


 English Made in Brazil -- English, Portuguese, & contrastive linguistics
to bring off x to pull off  –  ricky  04/NOV/2005, 1:29 PM
 to bring off x to pull off  –  Dale/RS  05/NOV/2005, 3:31 AM
Dale- to bring off x to pull off  –  Ricky  06/NOV/2005, 8:33 AM
Dale- to bring off x to pull off  –  Dale/RS  06/NOV/2005, 1:47 PM
to Dale  –  ricky  07/NOV/2005, 8:28 AM

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