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Autor:  Dale/RS
E-mail:  dale.thomas@hy.com.br
Data:  30/ABR/2006 11:31 AM
Assunto:  Phrases
 
Mensagem: 

Hi, Dale! I guess this is the very first time I'll have to desagree disagree with you. I did write the sentence correctly, and before I post posted that it I kinda of had a vaguely vague idea about what the guy who said the phrase meant by that. Let's see:

  

 

      People were flocking off to this big house where was being held a wake of a nobel man  there was being held the wake of a nobleman  who (had) ruled the city for decades and had just died from a disease. The casket with the corpse was sorrounded surrounded by a buch bunch of locals who wanted, at least, to take the last look, to give the last good bye to the man who (had) meant so much to them. Some of them were crying, others were whispering to one another about his good deeds and stuff, a few were drinking, and there were also those who were drinking and crying.     

     Then, all at once a very debilitated elderly man, who probably was from the family, lifted his glass filled up with brand up and started a speech: "let's swig him to God".....I figured he meant "vamos beber em homenagem a ele" ou "vamos beber o difunto" as the word "swig'' means "to drink something in large mouthfuls", furthermore; google presented me with four entries for the sentence "Let's swig him to God and hope that he get to heaven". m'I in (Am I on) the right track?  

 

What you say makes sense.  However, where on earth are you getting this stuff?  It sounds like something from a hundred years ago.  The use of the word "nobleman" indicates that the wake is not taking place in the USA but probably in Europe.  Do they still have wakes there?  I've never attended a wake in the USA or even heard one held there in modern times.  Wow!  You found four entries in Google!  Do you think that maybe Google is trying to tell you something, that you've stumbled across an expression that you are not likely to hear again?  I think you're spinning your wheels, wasting your time, barking up the wrong tree.  Seriously, there is a lot of every day English out there waiting to be learned.

 

 

 


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Índice de mensagens


 English Made in Brazil -- English, Portuguese, & contrastive linguistics
Phrases  –  Deivis  29/ABR/2006, 1:10 PM
Phrases  –  Johannes  29/ABR/2006, 1:46 PM
Phrases  –  Marcio Osorio  29/ABR/2006, 1:57 PM
Phrases  –  Johannes  29/ABR/2006, 3:02 PM
Phrases  –  Dale/RS  29/ABR/2006, 11:08 PM
Phrases  –  Deivis  30/ABR/2006, 8:40 AM
 Phrases  –  Dale/RS  30/ABR/2006, 11:31 AM
Phrases - II  –  Dale/RS  30/ABR/2006, 11:37 AM
Phrases - II  –  Deivis  30/ABR/2006, 12:48 PM

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