Fórum EMB de Discussões
[  EMB's Main Menu  |  Forum Index  |  Cadastro  |  Search  ]
   
ENGLISH
PORTUGUESE
 LINGUISTICS & CULTURE


Autor:  orlando
E-mail:  não-disponível
Data:  01/DEZ/2003 1:19 PM
Assunto:  Re: to Tom and Miguel Vieira
 
Mensagem:  Interesting! Readers' Opinions from NYTimes December 1, 2003 Cheating in School, Cheating in Life (6 Letters) To the Editor: In "Exposing the Cheat Sheet, With the Students' Aid" (front page, Nov. 26), you claim that a high-pressure, achievement-oriented culture led to rampant cheating at affluent Staples High School in Westport, Conn. But blaming the system for cheating ignores the culpability of the students themselves. Students must learn to resist temptation, or they will crack under pressure for the rest of their lives. After high school, there will be pressure to succeed in college, get ahead and make large sums of money. Cheating can be rewarding in many lines of work, as we have seen in the recent accounting and mutual fund scandals. These privileged students are the ones most likely to be running our major institutions in 15 years. They must begin resisting temptation today. PAM PAXTON PAUL VON HIPPEL. Columbus, Ohio, Nov. 27, 2003 . To the Editor: Re "Exposing the Cheat Sheet, With the Students' Aid" (front page, Nov. 26): In our society, acquiring wealth has been the most important goal for a long time. Now that many have attained it, there's a new status symbol: an Ivy League education. Why would anyone, especially a kid, believe that this new holy grail should be achieved honestly, when so much evidence shows that the biggest success goes to cheaters who don't get caught? Knowledge and wisdom should be goals in and of themselves. But acquiring them is hard work, with no guaranteed payoff except joy and self-respect. ADELE BILDERSEE New York, Nov. 26, 2003 The writer is the director of libraries and information services at the Dalton School in New York • To the Editor: Perhaps parents who are in denial about student cheating ("Exposing the Cheat Sheet, With the Students' Aid," front page, Nov. 26) should consider the consequences of sending into the labor force young men and women who, because they cheated their way through school, are unprepared to do the work for which they are hired. Purely from a practical standpoint, wouldn't these parents want accomplished workers to perform the services they rely on for their health, safety and well-being? MEL MINTHORN Wilton, Conn., Nov. 26, 2003 . To the Editor: Re "Exposing the Cheat Sheet, With the Students' Aid" (front page, Nov. 26): In the 1930's, I had 12 years of primary education at a small progressive school in Alabama. The classes were small. The teachers could work with students individually, and make learning fun. There were no grades, no marks and no cheating. And parents didn't have to bribe their children to excel. MALCOLM CAMPBELL Montclair, N.J., Nov. 26, 2003 • To the Editor: Re "Exposing the Cheat Sheet, With the Students' Aid" (front page, Nov. 26): If one of the reasons that schools don't punish student cheaters is the fear that the students' parents will sue them, then perhaps high schools should consider the following option: Redesign student honor codes to include an optional, but legally binding, code for parents who agree to support the principles of academic integrity and reject legal action if their child is found guilty of cheating. In addition, transcripts from schools that use such a code should indicate if a student's parents endorsed it. Given the increasing importance of students' values, I would think that college admissions committees would be very interested in this piece of information. MIGUEL ROIG Rumson, N.J., Nov. 26, 2003 The writer is an associate professor of psychology, St. John's University, Staten Island. • To the Editor: "Exposing the Cheat Sheet, With the Students' Aid" (front page, Nov. 26) reminded me of a former high school buddy, who told me that he had a foolproof method for cheating on exams. "What you do is, you lay out all your cheat sheets the night before the exam — and then you memorize them," he explained. "That way there's no evidence!" ETHAN GORENSTEIN Metuchen, N.J., Nov. 26, 2003 Source:The New York Times


Envie uma resposta
Índice de mensagens


 English Made in Brazil -- English, Portuguese, & contrastive linguistics
to Tom and Miguel Vieira  –  Ana Maria  30/NOV/2003, 8:44 PM
Re: to Tom and Miguel Vieira  –  Tom  30/NOV/2003, 11:31 PM
Re: to Tom and Miguel Vieira  –  Fabio  01/DEZ/2003, 5:08 AM
Re: to Tom and Miguel Vieira  –  Maria Valeska  01/DEZ/2003, 11:18 AM
Re: to Tom and Miguel Vieira  –  Fabio  01/DEZ/2003, 1:00 PM
 Re: to Tom and Miguel Vieira  –  orlando  01/DEZ/2003, 1:19 PM
Re: to Tom and Miguel Vieira  –  orlando  01/DEZ/2003, 2:14 PM
Re: to Tom and Miguel Vieira  –  Maria Valeska  02/DEZ/2003, 3:14 PM

Contents of this forum are copy-free.
By S&K